What to Look for When Choosing an Essential Oil

Clear Labeling: most of this information should be listed on the bottle itself such as common name, latin name, chemotype, and distillation date.  If not listed on the label the rest of the information should be easily accessible on the company’s website.

Common name: This is the name that most people will recognize such as Lavender or Lemon.

Latin name: It is important to know the latin name because it is the only way to truly know which essential oil you are buying.  It helps to distinguish between the different species of the same genus.  Some essential oils can go by the same common name such as Chamomile or Lavender, but the constituents that make them up are different.  This is important to know so you get the right therapeutic properties to help your given situation, and also so you get the correct safety information.  For example, Roman Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) is safe to use with babies and young children where as German Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) is not.

Chemotype when appropriate: Chemotype is the ability of some plants to make different chemical constituents depending on the environment in which it grows.  It is important to know the different chemotypes because they have different therapeutic properties and safety considerations.  For example, Rosmarinus officinalis ct camphor is a good choice for muscle aches and pains.  Where as Rosmarinus officinalis ct verbenone is good for clearing mucus.

Date of distillation:  Every essential oil has a shelf life and it starts the day it was distilled.  This should be listed on the bottle.  Many essential oil companies will have a batch number listed on their essential oil bottle, and then you would have to cross reference that on the company’s website to find the distillation date.

Country of origin: This is important because climate, soil conditions, and altitude can all affect the therapeutic properties of the essential oils.

Net contents: This is where you would find the amount of essential oil in the bottle such as 15ml.

Name and address of the distributor: Some essential oil bottles are quite small which makes it hard to include the address, so many companies list their name and website.  You can then visit the site to find their address.

Safety warnings: This is where you would find basic safety considerations such as keep out of reach of children or do not use while pregnant.  The website should have more specific information concerning each essential oil that they are selling.

Method of extraction: There are four ways an essential oil can be extracted which include steam distilled, CO2 extracted, cold pressed, and solvent extracted.  Knowing how the essential oil was distilled will help with safety considerations, for example, steam distilled lime is not phototoxic where as cold pressed is. It will also help you to determine if a solvent was used during extraction which can be either toxic or non-toxic.  Some people like to avoid any chance of a toxic substance being used in their products even though most of it should evaporate during processing.

Plant part used: Essential oils can be extracted from different parts of a a plant or tree.  Depending on which plant part is being used there are different therapeutic properties as well as safety considerations.

Cultivation method: It is best to buy essential oils that are organic, wild harvested, or unsprayed.  This is the only way to know that your essential oils have not been grown using pesticides, chemicals, or herbicides,.

Website:

Testing: I prefer to buy essential oils from companies who batch test each essential oil.  The Gas Chromatography/ Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) report should be accessible directly on the website, or some companies will send it to you when requested.  The reports will show the chemical make-up of a particular essential oil which is helpful when blending for therapeutic reasons.  The report can also show if the essential oil as been adulterated.

Safety information: Each essential oil has its own set of safety guidelines such as drug interactions and health & age considerations.

Other:

Storage: The essential oils should be kept cool and not be stored in direct sunlight.  If there is dust on the bottle it is a sign that the essential oil has been sitting out for a long period of time which increases the chance of oxidization, losing therapeutic properties, and loss of fragrance.  The essential oils themselves should be stored in dark glass bottles.  This is because oils can dissolve plastic over time which will contaminate the oils.  The dark color helps protects the oils from damaging sunlight.

Fragrance oil or perfume oil: I would avoid buying essential oils with these labels because it is an indicator that the essential oil is not pure.

Therapeutic Grade: This label is used for marketing and does not necessarily mean that it is a high quality oil.  There is no government regulating body that grades essential oils so any company can use this label.

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Geranium

Latin Name: Pelargonium roseum x asperum

Aroma: Floral, fresh, rosy

Plant Part Used: Leaves

Method of Extraction: Steam distilled

Countries of Origin: South Africa

Approximate Shelf Life: 4-5 years

Note: Middle

Therapeutic Uses: Analglesic, diuretic, anti-fungal

Emotional/ Energetic Qualities: Creates a sense of security & stability, increase imagination

Safety Concerns: Non-toxic & non-irritating

Recipe Blend

Bug Spray
4 drops cedarwood
2 drops patchouli
3 drops geranium
2 drops juniper berry
1 drop lemongrass
1/2 oz peppermint hydrosol
1/2 oz witch hazel hydrosol
1 oz aloe vera gel

References: Tisserand & Young Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Edinburg 2014

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Black Spruce

 

Picea mariana cones.jpg

Latin Name: Picea mariana

Aroma: Coniferous, piney, woody, fresh

Plant Part Used: Needles

Method of Extraction: Steam Distilled

Countries of Origin: Canada

Approximate Shelf Life: 4-5 years

Note: top/middle

Therapeutic Uses: Decongestant, anti-inflamatory, anti-spasmodic, soothes joints

Emotional/ Energetic Qualities: Grounding, calming, sedative, increases focus, opens the heart chakra

Safety Concerns: No known safety concerns.  If the oil is oxidized it could cause sensitization.

Recipe Blend

Cough Lotion

5 drops Black Spruce
5 drops Cedarwood
3 drops Lavender
2 drops Ravinsara

Mix into 1 oz unscented lotion.  Apply to chest and back as needed.  Do not use on children under the age of 10.

References: Tisserand & Young Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Edinburg 2014

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Basil (Sweet)

 

Latin Name: Ocimum basilicum ct. linalool

Aroma: Spicy, Sweet

Plant Part Used: Flowers, Leaves

Method of Extraction: Steam distilled

Countries of Origin: Mediterranean, Europe, India

Approximate Shelf Life: 5 years

Note: Top

Therapeutic Uses: Helps to relieve nausea, destructive to bacteria, antiviral, helps to break up mucus

Emotional/ Energetic Qualities: Strengthens self-confidence,  brings clarity to the mind, uplifting

Safety Concerns: There is a risk of skin sensitization depending on chemotype.  Use at a maximum 3% dilution to be safe.

Recipe Blend

Inhaler for Nausea

- 7 drops Basil (Sweet)
- 5 drop Peppermint
Add essential oils to cotton pad and insert into inhaler, or store in a plastic bag.  Take a couple deep sniffs when you feel nausea coming on.

References: Tisserand & Young Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Edinburg 2014

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Eucalyptus Globulus

Latin Name: Eucalyptus globulus

Aroma: Fresh, camphourus

Plant Part Used: Leaves

Method of Extraction: Steam distilled

Countries of Origin: Australia, China, Spain

Approximate Shelf Life: 4 years

Note: Top

Therapeutic Uses: Destructive to bacteria, breaks up mucus,  inhibits the growth of viruses, anti-inflamatory

Emotional/ Energetic Qualities: Uplifting, clears the mind

Safety Concerns: Do not use on children under the age of 10 due to the high 1,8 cineole (can cause breathing issues), use caution if you have asthma.

Recipe Blend

Keep your Sickness to Your Self-

If you are around people that are sick put a few drops of Eucalyptus globulus on a cotton ball and keep it on your desk.  You can also keep the cotton ball in a baggie and sniff it a few times through out the day.

 

References: Tisserand & Young Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Edinburg 2014

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Grapefruit Essential Oil

 

http://canigivemydog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Can-I-give-my-dog-grapefruit.jpg

Latin Name: Citrus paradisi

Botanical Family: Rutaceae

Aroma: Fruity, fresh, citrus

Plant Part Used: Rind

Method of Extraction: Cold pressed

Countries of Origin: USA, Spain

Approximate Shelf Life: 5-6 years

Note: Top

Therapeutic Uses: Destructive to bacteria, diuretic, stimulates the immune system

Emotional/ Energetic Qualities: Uplifting, cleansing, reduces tension

Safety Concerns: Can cause skin irritation (especially if old or oxidized), phototoxic

Recipe Blend

Room Spray

Add 24 drops to 2 oz of water in a spray bottle.  Spray in a room to freshen the air.

References: Tisserand & Young Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Edinburg 2014

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Lavender Essential Oil

 

a hummingbird hovers in the front of a flower

Latin Name: Lavandula angustifolia

Botanical Family: Lamiaceae

Aroma: Floral, fresh

Plant Part Used: Flowers

Method of Extraction: Steam distilled

Countries of Origin: India, S. France, Italy, Bulgaria

Approximate Shelf Life: 5-6 years

Note: Top/Middle

Therapeutic Uses: Skin nourishing, calming, soothing to sore muscles, strengthens vitality, removes unpleasant odors, helps inhibit the spread of microbes.

Emotional/ Energetic Qualities: Balancing, clarity, introspection, helps to align all the chakras, clearing

Safety Concerns: Non-toxic and non-irritating

Recipe Blend

Hand Cleanser for adults:

1 oz aloe vera gel
5 drops Lavender
5 drops Peppermint
4 drops Mandarin Orange
3 drops Black Spruce

Mix in a 1 oz flip top bottle.  Shake before using

Hand Cleanser for kids:

1 oz aloe vera gel
2 drops Lavender
2 drops Mandarin Orange
1 drop Tea Tree

Mix in a 1 oz flip top bottle.  Shake before using

References: Tisserand & Young Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Edinburg 2014

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Tea Tree Essential Oil Profile

Latin Name: Melaleuca alternifolia

Botanical Family: Myrtaceae

Aroma: Clean, Purifying, Medicinal, Fresh

Plant Part Used: Leaves

Method of Extraction: Steam Distilled

Countries of Origin: Australia, S. Africa

Approximate Shelf Life: 2-3 years

Note: Top-middle

Therapeutic Uses: It is a great oil to use in cases of bacterial and viral infections.  It can be used as a disinfectant when making cleaning products.

Emotional/ Energetic Qualities: Uplifting and builds confidence.

Safety Concerns: Non-toxic, but may cause irritation in people with sensitive skin.  It may cause sensitization if oxidized.

Recipe Blend:  Sore Throat Gargle

Mix 1 drop of Tea Tree oil in a glass of warm water and gargle with it.   You can do this several times a day for 2-3 days starting at the first sign of sore throat.

References: Tisserand & Young Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Edinburg 2014

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Cedarwood Profile

FeaturePics-Cedar-Trees-172102-2937154Latin Name: Juniperus virginiana

Botanical Family: Cupressaceae

Aroma: Balsamic, Sweet, Woody

Plant Part Used: Wood

Method of Extraction: Steam Distilled

Countries of Origin: USA

Approximate Shelf Life: 8 years

Note: Base

Therapeutic Uses: This oil is great for cough & respiratory issues since it is known to break down mucus and remove it from the respiratory system.  It has an astringent quality which helps to protect the skin from toxins and bacteria making it a good choice for acne. It can be calming to the nervous system which makes it a useful oil when dealing with stress and anxiety.  It is also a good choice when making your own bug repellant.

Emotional/ Energetic Qualities: This oil is a good choice if you are working with the 1st Chakra – it helps to protect, ground, and balance.

Safety Concerns: None known.  Some sources advise avoiding this oil during pregnancy, however there is no research to support this claim with this particular species of Cedarwood.

Contraindications: None known.

Recipe Blend:

Sinus Opener Inhaler
5 drops of Mandarin (Green) (citrus reticulata)
4 drops of Cedarwood (juniperus virginiana)
2 drops Lavender (lavandula angustifolia)
1 Blank Inhaler

Add the oils to the cotton part of a blank inhaler, and then insert it into the plastic tube.  Use the inhaler whenever symptoms arise.  The inhaler should last 3-6 months depending on use.  Safe for adults & children over the age of 5.

References: Tisserand & Young Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Edinburg 2014

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A New Year at Hummingbird Aromatics

Happy New Year! This is the time of year that many people start to think about what they would like the upcoming year to bring, and I am no exception. This year I plan to grow my business by helping others along their aromatic journey. I have been thinking a lot about the best way to do this, and I think getting people excited about essential oils is a great place to start. Essential oils have a great aroma as well as many therapeutic benefits. I feel like I am learning something new each day, and I can’t wait to share this information with you. So you may be wondering how will I be doing this… read on to find out.

Aromatic Thursdays:

This is where I will profile a new essential oil every other week on my Facebook page as well as offer a blending recipe. This means that at the end of the year you will have a basic understanding of 26 essential oils and how they can benefit you in your every day life. I would love for my Facebook page to become more interactive so please leave comments, and questions are welcomed. If there is anything else you would like to see on this page, I would love to hear your suggestions.

Home Parties:

I recently taught an “Introduction to Essential Oils” class at my home with a few friends, and we had so much fun. I loved the intimate setting because we had the opportunity to explore more oils, and each guest was able to customize and add their own creative twist to the blends that they made. I will be offering more of these classes, and wanted to open them up to you, my readers. If you are interested in hosting a class please message me, and we can create a customized class that is perfect for you and your guests.

Community Events & Classes:

I will continue to offer classes at the Healing Place throughout the year. I am also looking into offering classes at other local venues as well. I would love to offer information sessions at libraries, non-profits, and other community groups. If you are interested in having me speak please contact me. I will update my website as events and speaking engagements are added.

Blogging:

I have heard from many people that I should be up with the times and offer a blog, so I am going to try my hand at it. Since I have never blogged before, my goal is to do one a month until I am more comfortable with it. I will be having a link on my website as well as my Facebook page.

Products for Sale:

I love using products made with essential oils because they feel & smell great, and it gives me peace of mind that my body is not being burdened with synthetic chemicals. Recently, my son and I made lip balms to give out as Christmas gifts, and I received wonderful feedback on them. I was told by many that I should be selling them, so I will be looking into selling online as well as locally. I will update my website once these are in place.

If you enjoyed this post, I’d be very grateful if you’d help it spread by emailing it to a friend, or sharing it on Twitter or Facebook. Please explore my website and like my Facebook page. Thank you!

Wishing you peace, happiness, and prosperity in 2015!

Erica at Hummingbird Aromatics
Certified Aromatherapist

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